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She was my doctor when...
Records 1-15 of 62
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NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Suzanne Simpson
Judith Herman
Psychiatry
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
The present
STORY:
I wonder whether Judith Herman of Harvard University can imagine how many lives she has touched, how much hope she has inspired, through her work--even against the high odds imposed by a fairly deaf society. A pioneer in the study of post-traumatic stress syndrome and abuse of women and children, Dr. Herman has set the standard for care of victims of abuse or other trauma. Dr. Herman is noted for her brilliance, integrity, compassion, and a vision that encompasses tireless and incisive advocacy. Her "Trauma and Recovery" is considered a landmark publication and perhaps, someday, will lead to a substantially "kinder and gentler" world.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Joanne Lynn
Dr M. Dorcas Clark
General Medicine
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1939
West Virginia and Maryland
STORY:
Dorcas Clark became a physician because she was denied admission to nursing school. Arriving at college in 1939, she tried to sign up for nursing, but she could not because that required being 18. Not yet 18, she quietly signed up for pre-med. No one asked her age - they just thought she'd grow out of it. Having served thousands of patients, first in rural general practice, then in radiology, many are grateful that she simply never stopped when fate directed her in an unusual path.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Tassy Parker, PhD, RN
Gayle DineChacon
Family Medicine
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
Continuing
University of New Mexico
STORY:
Dr. Gayle DineChacon not only inspires me, but has also made a difference in our community and in the state of New Mexico. A member of the Navajo Nation, she is pursuing her dream to provide a responsive system of health services, research, education, and community partnerships to benefit the health of American Indian people throughout the State. The realization of that dream is just beginning as Dr DineChacon provides leadership to a team of Native faculty and staff in the evolving Center for Native American Health (CNAH), based within the University of New Mexico, Health Sciences Center - School of Medicine. She works tirelessly for her Native American patients living on tribal lands as well as those residing in the urban setting while at the same time garnering support and generating enthusiasm for the development of the CNAH. In addition, Dr. Dine Chacon is a wife, mom (with children at college and in high school), and a great and caring friend.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Dr. Sherry L. Robbins
Dr. Jackie Lloyd
Family Practice
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1985 through present
Eastern Tennessee
STORY:
In my first year of medical school, Dr. Lloyd became my personal physician. She was a full time family medicine faculty member at ETSU, where I was attending medical school. I also had the opportunity to work with her in some of my classes. In recent years, I have also worked with her as a colleague after I became a faculty physician, myself. I have always admired her calm, professional manner. As a patient, I was readily at ease with her and felt that she truly listened to my questions and concerns. As a student, I admired her eloquence and strong knowledge base. She served as an excellent role model and talked openly with us students about the challenges of balancing a full-time practice and a family, sharing with us her acceptance of a certain amount of guilt in not being able to achieve perfection in either role, while still being very good at both. As a colleague, I have watched her advocate for patients and minorities, being appropriately assertive. When she speaks, everyone quites to listen, knowing that the bottom line is about to be spoken, tempered by wisdom and experience. I also have quietly admired her as she took a leave of absence to be by her mother's side during an extended illness, clearly revealing that her career could not ultimately take precedence over her family. She remains a strong role model for all of us female physicians, and I am very proud to know her.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Ruchi Garg
Dr. Mary Jo O'Sullivan
Maternal Fetal Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
2001
Miami, Florida
STORY:
Dr. O'Sullivan - a poised lady, a remarkable physician, an inspirational woman, a strong human being and an encouraging mentor. The clucking of her shoes makes everyone round-up and pay attention at 6 am on the Obstetrics antepartum unit at University of Miami - Jackson Memorial Hospital. Dr. O, as some of us like to refer her, makes an effort to get us to learn obstetrics through her experienced eyes and care for the patients like our own family. She contributes to every aspect of the department i.e. teaching residents, leading research projects, taking call on labor and delivery, leading the division... She is an amazing woman, physician, human being who deserves to be recognized.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Anonymous
Dot Richardson
Orthodpedic surgeon
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
home
STORY:
Dot Richardson is an Olympic gold medalist and an orthopedic surgeon. She was the first woman to hit a home run in the Olympics. Her two-run home run helped the United States win the first Olympic gold medal ever awarded in softball, in 1996. She is the founder and director of a state-of-the-art athletic training center in Florida. Dr. Richardson began her softball career in 1979 as a starter for the U.S.National Softball team and led them to a gold medal at the Pan American games that year. She took a one-year leave of absence from her orthopedic surgery residency at the University of Southern California to compete in the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, Georgia. She was back at USC to continue her residency (which she completed in 1999) three days after her team won the gold medal. Richardson was recently named vice chair of the President's Council on Physical Fitness and sports. She is the 2002 recipient of the Flo Hyman Award which is bestowed by the Women's Sports Foundation for "exemplifying dignity, spirit, and commitment to excellence." Richardson is currently the medical director of the USA Triathlon National Training Center in Orlando, Florida which is a state-of-the-art training facility.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
May Lyn Wake
Dr. Mary Bryan
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
Early 20th century
India and New York State
STORY:
Dr. Mary Bryan was my grandmother's great aunt. She was the first female physician in Ogdensburg, NY. It is said that she went west to Colorado, but did not like it and returned to New York State. She also was a missionary doctor in India around the turn of the century. She was an inspiration to me for two reasons. She was an educated woman for her time period, and she never married. She braved foreign travel and aided others. She saved the life of a prince in India and his mother wanted Dr. Bryan to return to India and be her private physician. I would like to know more about her time in India and the Methodist Missionary group for whom she served, and the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania where she went to school. She died in 1929.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Pearl Brown MD
Julia K Terzis
Microsurgery Facial Reanimation and Plastic Surgery
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
STORY:
Dr Terzis is internationally well known.Her web site has before and after pictures of restoration of function to paralyzed limbs and the face.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Veronica Kills Enemy - Nadeau
Dr. Mulligan-Witt
Family Practice
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
December 22, 2003
Valentine Medical Center, Valentine, NE.
STORY:
I had lost a daughter to a Drunk Driver in July of 1984 and her dream was to be a Doctor. She talked about her dream in June of 1984 and she was ten years old at the time and a month later she was killed by a drunk driver. She told me that she was going to graduate from High School and was not going to get married or have any children and that she was going to go to school to be a doctor and when she finished she might get married but that she was going to go on to school and learn about alcoholism and what it does to our bodies. Then she was going to come home and help her people. A couple of years ago I started going to the Valentine Medical Center in Valentine Nebraska. There I met Dr. Mulligan. I was so impressed with her and she looked so young. I told one of the nurses there how I felt about Dr. Mulligan and she said, "She is a new doctor and she is only 28 years old." I was all choked up because my daughter could have been a doctor and she could have been that age also if she was allowed to live. Dr. Mulligan takes good care of my family and good care of my grandchildren. I have been thinking that I would like to do a ceremony to honor her and her achievement. We are Native American and to see this young woman come this far makes me feel honored that she is our family doctor.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Ana M. Saavedra-Delgado, M.D., F.A.A.A.A.I.
Esther A. Torres, M.D., F.A.C.P., F.A.C.G.
Gastroenterology
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1949 to Present
San Juan, Puerto Rico
STORY:
Esther A. Torres, M.D., F.A.C.P., F.A.C.G. Changing the face of medicine: An inspiration for all that want to practice the medical profession fully, making a difference in their community. Tribute by Ana Maria Saavedra-Delgado, M.D., F.A.A.A.A.I., Alumna, Class of 1975, University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, Kensington, MD January 19, 2004. It has been about 27 years since I worked as a resident in Internal Medicine at the University District Hospital of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine; Dr. Esther A. Torres was the attending gastroenterologist. I had lost touch with her since relocating to the United States in 1977 until this past fall, when we reconnected after she had mentored my son--now a second year medical student in New York--while he did research in Puerto Rico this past summer. Catching up with Dr. Torres convinced me that her story needed to be shared, for the benefit of anyone interested in the practice of medicine and especially for Spanish-speaking Americans of all interests. Her commitment to the profession truly sets her apart. Her struggle for excellence has been continual and backed by many senior colleagues in Puerto Rico who have seen what she can do. Some of the achievements of Esther A. Torres, M.D., F.A.C.P., F.A.C.G. 1976: First female gastroenterologist in Puerto Rico 1981: First female Chief of the Gastroenterology Division of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine 1981: First female President of the Puerto Rican Association of Gastroenterology 1996: First female Chair, Department of Medicine of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine 1996: One of three women Chairs of Medicine in schools of medicine in the United States 2001: Associate Medical Director for LifeLink of Puerto Rico 2004: Chair of the Program Evaluation Committee for the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. The life of Dr. Esther A Torres is a testimonial to the excitement and passion for her profession and her care for others. She is a true leader and a model for all that want to practice the medical profession fully today, to make a difference in their community. Throughout her twenty-seven years in clinical practice, Dr. Torres has endeavored to serve her patients and community while maintaining many friendships and a rich personal life. She has been a leader in promoting academic medicine in Puerto Rico by mentoring colleagues, fellows, residents, and medical students from the island and abroad. She has directed the Gastroenterology fellowship program at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine since 1981, and has been the Chair of the Department of Internal Medicine since 1996. She takes pride on the academic accomplishments of her faculty, fellows and students and in the high level of medical care that they provide. In an effort to organize the future of medical leadership, she is councillor to the University of Puerto Rico Alpha Omega Alpha chapter and also as regional councillor coordinates joint activities with the three chapters of Alpha Omega Alpha in Puerto Rico. In addition to carrying out her duties as Chair of Internal Medicine and Professor, Dr. Torres still sees gastroenterology patients every day, personally follows and is the attending physician for all hospitalized inflammatory bowel disease patients at the University Hospital through out the year, and rotates for three months out of the year as the attending physician for the gastroenterology service at the hospital. She is the principal investigator of numerous clinical trials, many of which are part of national multi-center clinical studies, has taken leadership roles in committees at the national level in her clinical area of expertise and serves as one of the two medical directors of the program for coordinating organ procurement for transplants for patients in need in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Esther Torres was born and raised in Puerto Rico by her father, a civil engineer, and her mother, a dedicated homemaker; she has a younger sister. She told me: "Medicine is the only profession I can remember ever wanting to pursue although my mother told me that the very first thing I said I wanted to be was to be a teacher. Now I am both." The educational system in Puerto Rico had trouble keeping up with her. She skipped kindergarten and second grade in elementary school. In high school she skipped the 10th grade. She graduated in 1964 from the University of Puerto Rico High School, at the age of 15. By then she had already taken college credits in Spanish, English and Basic Sciences. She still remembers getting over her shyness as a very young freshman in college, but she took full advantage of the college opportunities available then to her, both academically and socially. She completed with honors a bachelor's degree in general sciences with a minor in English at the University of Puerto Rico, and actively participated in the Kappa Phi social sorority (local to Puerto Rico) and in their leadership, enjoying the camaraderie that she had missed while in high school. She was also member of the Pre-Med club and edited their newsletter. Tennis entered her life in college, following in the footsteps of her mother's side of the family, which had already produced two all-Puerto Rico tennis champions. Dr. Torres felt that going to medical school would be tough but she had the confidence instilled in her early on by her family, and in particular by her father, that there would not be any insurmountable barriers to her dream. At 19 years old, she was one of the youngest members of her medical school class at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, which consisted of 82 students, including 10 women. She recalls the collegiality of her classmates and also that it seemed that everyone stayed up all night. After flunking her first exam after a coffee-fueled all-nighter, she says that she began to study as soon as she got home and made sure to stop by 10 PM at the latest. It seems to have worked. The defining moment in her medical school career came the summer between her junior and senior year. Until then, she had planned to make a career in clinical pathology. That summer, she was hired by Dr. Pedro Humberto García-Pont to help out in a multi-center Post-Transfusion Hepatitis Study in the Veterans' Administration (VA) Hospital Investigation Unit. She participated with the residents in the didactic and clinical activities of the gastroenterology (GI) division and compiled a database of the liver biopsies done at the hospital (by hand using index cards in those days). Dr. García-Pont and his team were so impressed with their student assistant that they persuaded her in her senior year to change her planned residency in pathology at the University Hospital to an Internal Medicine internship at the VA Hospital. In retrospect, Dr. Torres says that she cannot imagine a better place for her to have done her internal medicine training. She enjoyed great faculty relationships, camaraderie between residents, and the opportunity to rotate early on among the different sub-specialties. She was already doing bone marrows, placing intraperitoneal dialysis cannulas, and performing liver biopsies by the time she was a second-year resident. Encouraged and sponsored by Dr. Elí Ramírez, Chief of Internal Medicine at the VA Hospital, she did a combined residency/fellowship program in gastroenterology in four years. The encouragement that she received during her internal medicine residency at the VA Hospital and the experience gained in those years gave her the self-confidence that helped her overcome the challenge of being the lone female in the field in Puerto Rico. She and four other GI fellows had to cover three hospitals with a large number of acute patients. Dr. Torres was the first woman to complete the gastroenterology fellowship and in doing so became the first woman to practice gastroenterology in Puerto Rico. Dr. Carlos Rubio, then Chief of Gastroenterology at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, recruited Dr. Torres as an Instructor at the Medical School and she was given the responsibility for teaching the second-year medical students. She supervised fellows, residents and medical students and also started her solo private practice one afternoon per week, using the office space provided pro bono to her for two years by Dr. Federico Hernández-Morales, as had been Dr. Hernández tradition for other fellows starting their practices. For the next five years, Dr. Torres kept both a full time academic load, with a schedule packed with committee meetings and lectures, and a small solo private practice, with her mother as her office assistant in addition to being her life-long personal role model. She still remembers the words of support that the late Dr. Roberto Rodríguez gave her, then the Acting Director of the Internal Medicine Department when she asked him for time to prepare for her Gastroenterology Boards in order to qualify for the position of Chief of Gastroenterology. She passed her Boards, and got the job in 1981 in an uncontested process with the full backing of the faculty and fellows, the first woman in this position in Puerto Rico. In this same year she became President of the Puerto Rican Association of Gastroenterology. During the next eight years, she worked to expand and strengthen the fellowship program. By then she had developed a special interest and expertise in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and those with liver diseases, and in particular, hepatitis. She took care of patients in the Puerto Rico Medical Center as well as those in her private practice. Soon she became well known in the medical community and became the point of referral from all over the island for patients with these medical conditions. By 1989 she received her promotion as Professor of Medicine, excelling in service, teaching and research. However, not everything in her schedule was work. She married Dr. Carlos Rubio in 1986 and found time in her schedule to develop her tennis game at the Baldrich tennis open public courts. There, she enjoyed the camaraderie of League Play at the 3.5 level. By 1994 she was part of a team of 10 Puerto Rican women that reached the semifinals of the U.S.T.A. National Championships in Palm Spring, CA. During the 1990s, Dr. Torres faced many challenges as well as opportunities. However, over time she turned adversity into strength, and this has become evident to those who deal with her. Her involvement in clinical research flourished. She presented her work in the United States, Europe, and in different parts of Latin America. In 1996 Dr. Angel Román Franco, then the Dean of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, asked her to take the position of Interim Director of Internal Medicine after Dr. Mario García-Palmieri retired from this position, one of the most senior medical positions on the island. At the time she was reluctant to do so but still remembers a conversation with her sister that went along these lines: "How are you going to say no to something you have not even tried?" She listened, and after two months in the acting job, she decided to compete for the regular appointment. With the backing of the faculty, residents and fellows, she was subsequently selected as the Chair of Internal Medicine at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, the first woman to occupy this position. Dr. Torres is now one of only seven women Chairs of Internal Medicine in the 126 medical schools in the United States. One of her prerequisites for accepting this position was that she would be allowed to continue what she loves most: patient care and teaching. Dr. Torres had to close her private practice of 20 years, but many patients followed her to the Medical School Intramural Practice. To this day, she sees patients every week-day for 2-3 hours, often starting work at 7:30 AM and finishing at.7:00 PM. She sees patients with hepatitis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), evaluates patients for liver transplant and follows them upon their return to Puerto Rico after the transplant. She says that one-on-one patient contact is the most important reward. She admits that the experience helps her "put other worries in life into perspective and is in many ways humbling." Over time, it became evident that there was a need to evaluate in an integrated manner IBD patients that had been followed for many years primarily from the surgical standpoint. Dr. Torres therefore opened a monthly multidisciplinary clinic about 4 to 5 years ago, where these patients can see both the IBD surgeons and the gastroenterologists, as well as receive nutrition and enterostomal counseling, avoiding the need to make additional trips to the Medical Center. In addition, Dr. Torres continues to coordinate and provide medical counsel for the monthly Saturday support group for Inflammatory Bowel Disease patients that she began in 1994, and still personally provides medical care, including taking calls year-round for her hospitalized patients with IBD. Dr. Torres truly enjoys the teaching aspect of academic medicine. It is one of her greatest sources of satisfaction to see the student, resident or fellow learn, develop, and become aware of their own capabilities and step up to the challenge of the practice of medicine. She supervises GI fellows, residents and students rotating through gastroenterology and the hospitalized patients under their care for three months a year. Since 1999, Dr. Torres also directs the weekly liver transplant clinic, supervising the work of GI fellows and rotating residents. She remains dedicated to clinical research and her fellows are significantly involved in it. She uses a team-building approach. Fellows are supervised but also are given responsibilities to help run this research as sub-investigators. They work hand-in-hand with the research coordinators, and also function as co-authors in published research. Dr. Torres also encourages and expects them to present their findings to the academic community. Dr. Torres also uses a team building approach as she performs her daily duties as Chair of the Department of Internal Medicine, by sharing responsibility and delegating duties. She will not ask others to do what she is not willing to do herself. She is known for a straight-forward approach, is very accessible, and lets the faculty, fellows and residents know where she stands. She listens to other's ideas and promotes independent thinking. Dr. Carmen González-Keelan, Professor of Pathology at the medical school, says that Dr. Torres knows how to motivate people to do their best, and how to give positive and affirming feedback. Dr. Torres participates in national and international meetings in her area of expertise, demonstrating the strengths, values, and the commitment to excellence and service of her department and of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. She is also an active participant in professional associations such as the American College of Physicians, the American College of Gastroenterology, the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease and the Association of Professors of Medicine. Dr. Torres also finds time to travel and to explore new places. She is never one to miss an art museum, particularly if French Impressionism is on display, and goes to concerts, musicals and plays. At home, she cherishes a good game of tennis, visiting with family and friends, reading fiction, listening to classical music and ballads, and catching a well-deserved good night's sleep. But most of all, she continues to look forward to the excitement of a new day full of challenges and possibilities.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
shiv kumar
smita pathan
medicine
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1992
jaipur
STORY:
it was a rainy day when i got some throat infection; fever & some cold. my dad told me to had a warm bath . but when i took bath , i got more problem. i decided to meet with dr. smita as she was my personal doctor. she hold me tight whole the night, now for the next morning i was totally relaxed & till today i am doing the same. for past ten years she is only my doctor for all disease ......................
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Bambi Ray Cochran
Rowena Spencer
pediatric surgery
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
Louisiana
STORY:
I am currently researching Dr. Spencer and her family's contributions to medicine in Louisiana for my master's thesis. Dr. Spencer inspires me because she has overcome much difficulty to achieve her goals. Though retired, she is still one of the most knowledgeable physicians on conjoined twins. I believe that her achievements should be lauded because she worked very hard during her career to overcome gender discrimination at Johns Hopkins and in Louisiana.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
a co-worker
Norma Rosales
pediatrics
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
past, current and on-going
East LA & Venice, in Los Angeles, Calif.
STORY:
Dr. Rosales, daughter of a german father and mexican mother, was born and went to schools in East Los Angeles. A very shy child, she became a high-school cheerleader who was counseled to go on to vocational school. Her older sisters, pyschologists and educators, encouraged her to enter college, after which she attended medical school in Boston, continuing in the healthcare tradition of her "curandera" mother. Completing pediatric training in Los Angeles, she then joined the staff of the largest free clinic in the country, where she is lead/chief pediatrician. She is an ardent, forceful advocate for the low-income families she serves, many of whom are spanish-speaking & new to the area. An outstanding teacher for other clinic staff, area medical students and residents, "Doctora Norma" is loved by her clinic families.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Christine Fleuriel
Denise Faustmann
Immunology
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1989
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
STORY:
I have been the librarian at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for over 15 years, starting on December 1, 1988. Dr. Faustman was a post-doc at that time, whom I helped on several occasions. It has been very enjoyable to have been able to watch her career and to feel that I had a hand in it early on.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Shawn
Dr. Brad
surgery
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1998
West Ham,England
STORY:
That time i was fourteen years and i loved the soccer teams in England so of course i wanted to play soccer. When school started i played for the team. When we played against the other school team i injured my leg very badly, and i couldn't move it at all. So my mom looked in the phone book for a doctor, because i didn't have one. And i usually don't need a doctor because i never had medical pr physical problems. But this happened to be the first time. So my grandmother knew a very good doctor named Dr. Brad, and she could help me. She introduced her way of showing me what she will do in order to help my leg. After the surgery my leg would take about four months until i could play soccer again. But i stopped playing that sport, because it was too dangerous. Now i just play basketball. In the future iwant to be a doctor in international medicine, so i can help other people with medical problems. And i also want to find a cure for AIDS and STD.
Records 1-15 of 62
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