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She was my doctor when...
Records 1-15 of 48
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NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Alex Randall
Nina Perlingiero Randall MD
Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
lifetime
Abington Pennsylvania
STORY:
When I was a baby she was a pediatrician, when I grew older - she moved into the special needs of hyperactive boys. Fortunately she became a college MD and began to take a special interest in women's eating disorders so I was spared her changing interests in the third phase of her life. With the anorectics and bulimics, she practiced what I called "Italian Therapy." It was about re-socializing the girl's eating habits and teaching them the social role of eating. In our family it was just Mom's way of doing medicine. We'd chuckle at her and dismiss her therapy as eccentric until the day Dr. Margaret Mead showed up on the doorstep to investigate Nina's special way of treating patients. Dr. Mead watched Nina practice for several days and then declared " I know why your method works. You take them into your kitchen." It was true. Nina practiced medicine in our home, in the small room off the dining room. She worked full long days and when she got tired of her office chair, she'd move the session into our kitchen and talk with these bulimic and anorectic girls in our family kitchen, slipping a piece of cheese on a plate and talking about everything except food. Casually the girls would pick up the cheese and before long she'd be eating normally again. Nina was amazing. She had the healing power of a gypsy with the medical prowess of a Univ. of Pennsylvania Med school graduate. She could diagnose things with a touch of her hand and her keen powers of observation. She flummoxed my father who was a Harvard Doctor and had to have his lab results to make a diagnosis. Nine just saw people asked a couple of questions or touched them and started talking about treatment. Father came from a family of famous doctors. Nina came from a poor immigrant Italian family and grew up in a poor section of Trenton NJ. Girls from her neighborhood didn't go to college, much less medical school, but she had a bout of Rheumatic fever at an early age and in a fever pitch, she saw an angel who told her to be a doctor. As far as we know, she did nothing but study and play piano from that date until she graduated from medical school. She had to cry (a lot) to get her father to let her go to college. She had to cry a lot more to get her father to let her go to medical school. She finished Mt Holyoke in 3 years (Phi Beta Kappa) and went to Penn without a college degree... she HAD to finish her first year of medical school or have no degree at all. She was one of three women in that class of 1939 and suffered all manner of abuse at the hands of the men. They teased her and tormented her and tried to break her spirit, but Nina was undaunted. She finished with honors, won prizes and lead research groups. She single handedly ran her unit at the HUP hospital during the Second World War... The men were all away at war, but the babies continued to need her skills. She was there when they experimented with Penicillin on Meningitis and witnessed the miracle cure of modern medicine. She entered the profession with the advent of antibiotics and stopped practicing the day she died. From 1939 until 2001 she practiced continuously... even bring me - as a baby - into her office to nurse me while teaching other mothers about baby care. She was a pioneer. She was a wonderfully strong spirit who did angel's work her whole life. And she had it all.. career, husband, family and the whole package. In her last week of life, she saw patients on Monday, flew to her pregnant daughter-in-law's side on Tuesday, she took care of the elder children on Wednesday, played with the new baby on Thursday and died on Friday. Josephine Giovannina Perlingiero Randall MD - 1918 - 2001 Doctor Extrodinaire.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
George A. Snook M.D.
Mary Poland Snook M.D.
General Practice
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1930 to 1961
Chesterfield and Worthington, Massachusetts
STORY:
Dr. Snook graduated from Boston Univ Medical School in 1923. After an internship and a short period of practice at a private sanatorium she entered the practice of general medicine in Chesterfield and surrounding hill towns in western Massachusetts. As the first woman physician in this area she was unique but men felt no uneasiness when examined by her. She practiced true general medicine including obstetrics and minor surgery. She conducted well child clinics and assisted local Boards of Health. She made house calls including home deliveries in all kinds of weather using whatever transportation was available. This included automobile, horse and buggy, horseback, sleigh and on occasion the town plow. In 1932, Governor Joseph Ely created a sensation when he appointed Dr. Snook as the first woman Medical Examiner in Massachusetts and possibly the country. She served on the staff of the Cooley Dickinson Hospital in Northampton and served as a staff physcian and rotating director of the staff service for four months a year. She twice served as President of the Hampshire District Medical Society. In 1948 she was appoited director of the Outpatient Department of the Northampton State Hospital which she served till her death in 1961. The tradition continued as her son was an orthopedic surgeon and her grandaughter is a graduate of Northwestern Medical School.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Flora M Green
Dr Esther M Buchanan
Anesthesia
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1936 was the begining
Pennsylvania/Utah
STORY:
Aunt Sarah, who was a schoolteacher and believed in Esther, she was able to fulfill her dream. This was during the great Depression and there was very little ready money available so this was a very real struggle to be able to attend Med School. She graduated in 1939 and secured an Internship in Allentown General Hospital, Allentown, Pa. In September of 1940 she set up in General Practice, now known as Family Practice. She rented a little house in Souderton, Pa. I lived with her at that point, and the office was on the first floor and we lived upstairs. I remember her very first patient, an elderly Mennonite gentleman and he gladly paid the $1.00 which was the charge for an office call, and $2.00 for a house call!! Her practice grew and as many of the Doctors in that community left for the Armed Services, Dr Esther, as she was fondly known as to many, delivered many of the babies born in that area at this time. In 1946 she married and became Dr Esther M Buchanan and she and her new husband moved to Long Island N.Y. Esther's love of medicine never wavered and after the birth of her second child, she decided to further her education and enrolled at NYU school of medicine and continued with her speciality - Anesthesia. During this time she also worked at Bellevue Hospital in New York City. This plan was interrupted when her husband decided that he wanted to enter the medical field also, so the young couple with their two sons moved to Salt Lake City Utah. Esther enrolled at the University of Utah Medical School to complete her education in Anesthesia and worked at LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City. As her husband faced 4 years of Med school, Esther became the support of the family and other children came into her life, and the financial struggle was great, but Esther never wavered in her determination to continue in the career she so deeply loved. I wish I could remember many of the interesting things that happened to her, but recently she and I talked about the many advances in Medicine, and in Anesthesisa particularly. Two things stick in my memory - she often went to Park City, UT to give anesthesia to miners who had been injured in the mines there - the choice of anesthesia were quite limited---Gas or Ether!!! Part of her career was spent in a small town Richfield, Ut where her husband set up in general practice and Esther (Dr.Buchanan) served as the anestheologist in the local hospital Esther faced many instances of descrimination, for example. There were a number of physicians who refused to address her as Dr. Buchanan. Dr. Esther M. Buchanan worked at Holy Cross Hospital for many years and retired at age 70. She is considered a "Legend" in the Utah medical community. Esther continued to get her CME credits and kept her license in effect until 2 years ago. She is now 89 years old and lives in a retirement community in Sandy, Ut
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
LOU
JESSICA
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1989
CHINA
STORY:
I WAS SAVED AFTER BEING IN AN ACCIDENT. THANK YOU JESSICA!
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Marta Svartman
Roseli Svartman Isfer
Dermatology
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
In the 1980s
Sao Paulo, Brazil
STORY:
Watching my little sister go through medical school and seeing her growing up to become a dedicated, serious and competent medical doctor was an amazing experience. The hardest part of it for me was to wake up at dawn for several years in a row, as she would always leave without turning the clock alarm off!! Anyway, watching her experience made me realize that doctors are born to be doctors and there is no way to become one if you are not born for it.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Elaine Flowers Duncan
Dr. Mary A. Flowers
Nephrology
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
STORY:
Dr. Mary Flowers is an exceptional doctor serving in Los Angles, Ca. She has been my personal role model since I can remember. She is my older sister and has overcome many obstacles. We grew up in rural Montgomery, AL. Although she come from a family of Black female mid wives, delivering most of the babies in our family, Mary became the first Medical School degreed doctor in our family, when she graduated from Harvard Medical School in 1978. Dr. Flowers has served as a nephrologist (kidney specialist) in Los Angles for over twenty years. I am amazed each time I visit the dialysis unit that she runs. She is helping keep so many people alive. Dr. Flowers has dedicated her life to her patients. She also dedicates her life to serving others in South Africa. She has given the sacrifice of not marrying and having children to serve 100 plus percent. She is an inspiration to me and many other African American female, motivating us to overcome obstacles and become whatever you may dream or want to be. I am a Systems Engineer with NASA and I owe it all to my sister, Dr. Flowers.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Madeline Holland
Jimmie Coker Holland
psycho-oncology
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
over my grandma's lifetime
various places
STORY:
My Grandma changed the face of medicine in many ways. She developed the field of Psycho-oncology, wrote the first text book of Psycho-oncology, started its first journal, and founded 2 societies internationally to recognize how important psychological care of cancer patients is. She was the chairman of psychiatry at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center for 25 years and trained over 100 people in psycho-oncology. She has won many awards and is a member of the Institute of Medicine. My Grandma is amazing, and I want to be like her when I grow up
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Susan and Edward Buyer
Edith Michael Buyer
psychiatry
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1894-1960
Europe and U.S.
STORY:
From Susan (granddaughter): My grandmother, Edith Selma Michael Buyer, received the M.D. degree from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1918. She was a classmate of Ethel Collins Dunham and Martha May Eliot, who are featured in the exhibit. Edith was born in New York City in 1894, the eldest of three daughters. Her father, Bernard Michael, son of a tailor from Prussia, owned a printing business that produced programs for the Metropolitan Opera. She was educated in New York and Leonia, NJ, schools, until the death of her father in 1906. After her father's death, her mother Annie Hamerschlag Michael took the three girls to Europe for what turned out to be an eight year stay. They lived near Hamerschlag relatives in Vienna for five years, where Edith attended the Real Gymnasium Fliegelmann. Great-grandmother Annie ("Oma"), daughter of liberal Jews from Bohemia and a radical for her time, encouraged her daughters to pursue education and careers, and to explore religious choices. Edith was most interested in the sciences, declared herself an agnostic, and later became active in the Ethical Culture movement. In addition to her regular curriculum, Edith studied fencing and singing. In 1911, they moved to Lausanne where Edith received her A.B. degree at the University of Lausanne, and then on to Paris in 1913 so that Edith could pursue pre-medical studies (Etudes Chemie, Physique et Naturelle ) at the Sorbonne, while her sister Alice studied art. Edith went mountain climbing in Switzerland and nearly lost her life dangling from a rope. She continued with singing lessons although no one really could say that she had a good voice. Since she was considered very beautiful, she had many beaux, and her youngest sister Dorothea remembered many years later that two young men had fought a duel over her favors. In the summer of 1914, perhaps realizing that her daughters knew very little of their American home and family, and perhaps anticipating the onset of war, Oma suddenly packed the three young women up and sailed for Boston aboard the S.S. America. Edith entered Johns Hopkins School of Medicine that fall, where she studied surgery with Dr. William Halsted and psychiatry with Dr. Adolf Meyer. Oma and the two younger sisters spent the first year in Baltimore, where, according to sister Dorothea, Edith was very busy often experimenting with animals, slide, skeletons, etc. in her room. After the first year, as Edith was quite settled and independent in Baltimore, the rest of the family moved on to Cambridge, Massachusetts, and later to New York. After graduation in 1918, Edith interned at the Boston Psychopathic Clinic and the Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic at Johns Hopkins. She worked during the summer of 1918 as a Research Assistant for the U.S. Children's Bureau, and in 1919-1920 as a Resident Physician at Butler Hospital in Providence, R.I. She also worked for the National Committee on Mental Hygiene in Baltimore on their survey of the mental health of children in Maryland public schools. She was licensed to practice medicine in Maryland and New York in 1920. In 1920, Edith married Samuel Buyer, a friend of her Uncle Royal, in New York, and had three children between 1921 and 1924. She was back at work by 1927 as the Medical Supervisor of the New Rochelle, NY, public school system, a position she held until her death in 1960. In the 1930s, Edith held an assistantship at Columbia University, was a member of the psychiatric staff at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center and New Rochelle Hospital, and appeared on the radio discussing "Guiding the School Child." In 1944, Edith requested leave from the New Rochelle school system to be commissioned as a Lieutenant Commander, Medical Corps, U.S. Naval Reserve, and was stationed at the WAVES Training School in the Bronx. A favorite photo in our family shows Edith in uniform between her two sons Ed and Roy, also in uniform, during World War II. She was a member the American Psychiatric Association, the American Medical Association, the American School Health Association, the New York State Medical Society, and Westchester Ethical Society. I was not quite eleven when my grandmother died, but I remember her as a forceful, energetic, determined person--a real whirlwind. Being taken sightseeing in New York by "Nana" was an exhausting experience, trying to keep up with my 60-something grandmother. From Ed: Mother had a brush with polio that left her with only minor foot damage. Her many visits to doctors in those early days piqued her interest in medicine that later brought her into the profession. When Dad's business collapsed in the depression that closely followed WWI she talked the school system of New Rochelle, N.Y., into hiring a medical supervisor and stayed in that position until retirement. She did the rounds of all of New Rochelle's public schools for many years, consulting her staff of nurses, examining children, counseling parents, rendering emergency treatment, and handling departmental administration. Dad died in October 1937, the year before her first child graduated from high school. We'll never know how she did it but she put all three of us through college between 1939 and 1946, providing funds, counsel, and a home during what must have been very lean years. With two sons in service during the World War II, she pitched in and served as a Lieutenant Commander with the WAVES. Seeing her standing on the dock to greet my returning troopship is a moment I've never forgotten.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Aatif Hayat
Unaiza Hayat
Internal Medicine
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
STORY:
As the eldest sibling in my family, Unaiza often functioned as the primary caretaker. We came to the states when she was 9 years old, but that didn't stop her from leading my mom and brothers and sisters through O'hare airport to find my dad. That's just the way she's always been, someone who'll go out of her way to help people in need. She's worked hard for herself and her family and her honesty and care reflects on her patients. Unaiza has done the world for me and i'm proud to be her younger brother.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Sheila Gorman
Dr. Mary Lorraine Gorman
Psychiatry
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1950's-1980
New York
STORY:
Dr. Mary Lorraine Gorman Year of Birth/Death 1919-1990 Medical School University of Vermont College of Medicine Geography Vermont New York Careers Pathologist School Physician Psychiatrist Health Care Administrator Dr. Mary Lorraine Gorman was born in 1919 in Maynooth, Ontario, Canada. She was the only child of John J. Gannon and Katherine (Ryan) Gannon. At a young age her family migrated to Fairfield, Vermont, where she became an essential "hand" to her father on their New England dairy farm. She attended grammar school at a one room school house in Fairfield and high school at St. Mary's Academy in St. Albans, Vermont. Since traveling was problematic during the 1930's, she boarded at the high school during the week and returned home during for weekends. Dr. Gorman, graduated with honors from St. Mary's Academy, and received a scholarship to the University of Vermont. She graduated from the University of Vermont in 1941 and immediately applied to the University of Vermont's College of Medicine. Unique to Dr. Gorman's decision to apply to medical school was the limited career opportunities available in the rural state of Vermont during this time period. Options such as farming or school teaching were not of interest. Therefore, the career of physician was a logical alternative. When she applied to medical school, she explained during the admission interview, that she would continue to apply each year until she was accepted. This determination of intent was repeated throughout her life and was an important factor in her success. Dr. Gorman received her medical degree from the University of Vermont's College of Medicine in 1944. She interned at Springfield General Hospital in Springfield, Massachusetts and completed her residency in pathology at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and Bellevue Hospital in New York City. Dr. Gorman met her husband, a surgical resident, at Bellevue and they married in 1950. She had 5 children, raising them primarily in Kingston, New York. Since dual physician marriages were rare in the 1950's and 1960's, the social models for accommodating the demands of child rearing within this context were also few. During the children's formative years, Dr. Gorman, concentrated her time and energy on their needs and hung her medical degrees over the washing machine and dryer. After the children were "old enough" she became a physician in the local school system. Finally, as the children reached a greater sense of independence, she started working at the Hudson River State Psychiatric Center in Poughkeepsie, New York and completing a residency in psychiatry. During this time her husband was also working on developing a successful surgical practice within the town of Kingston, NY. The continued stress of these mutually demanding careers, the added stress of five children moving through teenage years and the absence of other women who were also physicians and mothers made life challenging and, at times, isolating. Dr. Gorman's natural curiosity helped compensate for this, and she developed her interests in interior decorating, art and literature. Dr. Gorman had a successful career at the Hudson River State Psychiatric Center, culminating as medical director and chief administrator of the Psychogeriatric Unit. Within this position she insured and promoted the quality, long term care of a challenging, and often forgotten segment of the geriatric population. In 1983, at the age of 64, she retired and settled in Rutland, Vermont. She continued her interest in art and also became active in local community projects such as the development of adult day care centers.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Sandy Altshuller Hughes
Dr. Lillis Flatman Altshuller
Pediatrics
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1960s
Cincinnati, Ohio
STORY:
Mom took care of poor kids. I remember traveling with her to clinics, juvenile court, and children's homes. Often the buildings were cold, shabby and smelled funny. She always treated the patients, parents, nurses, and aids with respect but she was often treated as an oddity or less able than her male colleagues. Neighbors, teachers and other kids' parents would never believe that my Mom was a doctor. "You mean a nurse. Women aren't doctors." I heard this refrain so many times that I doubted the truth. Now that I am an adult, I realize that she was an oddity of the best kind. She made the most of her ability and used it to help those that needed help.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Kamnesh Pradhan
Dianna L.Fox
Pediatrics, Advocacy
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
Current
Indianapolis, Indiana
STORY:
My dear wife Dianna. She is a Pediatrician who has come along a long way. While growing up on a farm in rural Iowa she realized health care should be universal and available to all. This sparked her interest in medicine. Coming from real humble but hardworking Iowan farming community she went to college and then medical school at the University of Iowa. She finally finished her residency at Indiana university where she is an assitant clinical professor of Pediatrics. Her passion is to train young doctors the importance of bridging partneships with community based organisations to foster and provide universal health care.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Elizabeth R. Drew
Dr. Katherine C. White
Neonatology
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1970's
Mostly in Maryland
STORY:
I could write volumes on the life of my mother, Dr. Katherine C. White, and the effect she's had on me, so its hard to know where to begin with this. She's a fifty-three-year-old practicing neonatologist, and I can't adequately express how proud I am to have her as a mother, much less kickin' around... but I want to try. Following in the footsteps of her mother, Rachel Wheat White, she attended Wellesley College after graduating from Linganore High School in 1969. She was a member of the graduating class of 1973, and even received the distinguished honor of Phi Beta Kappa. After acquiring her Bachelor's degree, she attended the University of Maryland Medical School, and received her Medical degree in 1977. She did her residency in pediatrics, then a fellowship in neonatology, the field dedicated to saving the lives of premature newborns. This may just seem like bragging, but there's more to the story than that. That precludes the fact that I do, of course, have bragging rights, since she *is* my mother... : ) Now, a person can choose to be proud of their parents, or they could just not give a damn. The reason I have always been so proud of her really pertains to her experiences in medical school. In 1972, her mother was diagnosed with Lymphoma, a paticularly lethal cancer which attacks the immune system. Throughout her scholastic career, she had considered a career in medicine; although much of the decision to go to medical school was based on her own desire to heal people, my mother was also influenced by her mother's illness. A few months into her schooling, her mother died at 49, one day before her 50th birthday. My mother's years in med school and as a resident were very challenging, to say the least. Not only did she have to cope with the loss of her mother, she was one of VERY few women in her class, males often treated her as a subordinate, and the hours a medical resident had to keep in the 70's would debilitate a previously well-rested horse, if you ask me. The fact that she made it out of it alive still astounds me; the fact that she stuck around for her 50th birthday is still a major relief. There's more to my mother's story than this, but I can only tell so much. It may seem odd that I mention her age and the fact that she's still kickin, since 50 is really not "old" at all (my family says your're not old until youre 100!). I know the possibility of her having given up somewhere along the ride, in any respect, would not have been something she'd allow herself to do; her stregnth and her character are traits I try to shape myself around.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Elizabeth Xiu-juan Wong
Ida Wong-Mai
Child Psychiatry
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1950s
Howard University, School of Medicine
STORY:
Growing up in the 1940s in San Francisco's Chinatown, my Auntie Ida must have been extremely self driven. She set her sights to become a physican. After graduating from the University of California, Berkeley, she applied to medical schools. When I was a young child, I heard from my Dad, her eldest brother, that Auntie Ida studied every day... and only took off a few hours on Christmas day. I believe she is the first woman of Chinese American descent to attend Howard University's medical school in Washington DC. The year of her graduation was either 1959 or 1960. Today, I will visit the medical school to find her class graduation photo on the wall. The whole Wong family is so proud of Ida Wong-Mai, the young woman who ventured beyond Chinatown.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Dorothy Taylor
Kimberly Hardin
Pulmonary and Sleep Disorders
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
June, 1996
Sacramento, Ca.
STORY:
Dr. Kimberly Hardin began her medical career as a Registered Nurse. Choosing to return to school and become a Doctor, she not only exceeded in her career studies, but she excelled, finishing many Fellowships and specialities. She choose to go into the Academic side of the Medical world and lectures medical students at the University of California at Davis. There, she is the Director of the Sleep Lab and also works with the Sleep Lab at the Veterens Hospital in Sacramento, testing the Veterens for sleep disorders. She is well loved by her patients and is known as a hard driving instructor to her students and expects them to be outstanding in their field, knowing the challanges in their future. She maintains a wonderful sense of humor, and has the ability to recount many funny events in the medical world. She has my admiration for having the initiative to persue her dream, become the best she could be and have fun doing it!
Records 1-15 of 48
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