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NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Maria
Docter Tulie
????
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
may 19, 2003
Docter Tulie's office
STORY:
in 2003, my docter had to give me a shot. I was so scared, but she ordered that the smallest needle be brought to her immediately. when she gave me the shot, she pushed with her fingers so that i couldn't tell where she would put it, and i couldn't feel it. then she did it very fast. thank you Docter Tulie!!!!!
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Marcia Meldrum
Lonnie Zeltzer
Pediatrics
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1990 to the present
Los Angeles, California
STORY:
Dr. Zeltzer is a pediatrician at the UCLA School of Medicine. She recognized that children are inadequately treated for chronic and recurrent pain, a problem which occurs in 10-20% of children in the US and may lead to loss of educational time and hinder social and emotional maturity. At her Pediatric Pain Program, begun in 1990, she has developed a biopsychosocial model of treatment which considers all the factors which may be involved in reinforcing the pain problem and helps the child to develop a sense of self-efficacy which helps them learn to function and cope with any pain recurrence. The Program has a remarkable record of success in alleviating children's pain. Dr. Zeltzer has also pioneered in research on gender differences in pain and on the importance of laughter as therapy.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Ana M. Saavedra-Delgado, M.D., F.A.A.A.A.I.
Esther A. Torres, M.D., F.A.C.P., F.A.C.G.
Gastroenterology
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1949 to Present
San Juan, Puerto Rico
STORY:
Esther A. Torres, M.D., F.A.C.P., F.A.C.G. Changing the face of medicine: An inspiration for all that want to practice the medical profession fully, making a difference in their community. Tribute by Ana Maria Saavedra-Delgado, M.D., F.A.A.A.A.I., Alumna, Class of 1975, University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, Kensington, MD January 19, 2004. It has been about 27 years since I worked as a resident in Internal Medicine at the University District Hospital of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine; Dr. Esther A. Torres was the attending gastroenterologist. I had lost touch with her since relocating to the United States in 1977 until this past fall, when we reconnected after she had mentored my son--now a second year medical student in New York--while he did research in Puerto Rico this past summer. Catching up with Dr. Torres convinced me that her story needed to be shared, for the benefit of anyone interested in the practice of medicine and especially for Spanish-speaking Americans of all interests. Her commitment to the profession truly sets her apart. Her struggle for excellence has been continual and backed by many senior colleagues in Puerto Rico who have seen what she can do. Some of the achievements of Esther A. Torres, M.D., F.A.C.P., F.A.C.G. 1976: First female gastroenterologist in Puerto Rico 1981: First female Chief of the Gastroenterology Division of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine 1981: First female President of the Puerto Rican Association of Gastroenterology 1996: First female Chair, Department of Medicine of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine 1996: One of three women Chairs of Medicine in schools of medicine in the United States 2001: Associate Medical Director for LifeLink of Puerto Rico 2004: Chair of the Program Evaluation Committee for the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. The life of Dr. Esther A Torres is a testimonial to the excitement and passion for her profession and her care for others. She is a true leader and a model for all that want to practice the medical profession fully today, to make a difference in their community. Throughout her twenty-seven years in clinical practice, Dr. Torres has endeavored to serve her patients and community while maintaining many friendships and a rich personal life. She has been a leader in promoting academic medicine in Puerto Rico by mentoring colleagues, fellows, residents, and medical students from the island and abroad. She has directed the Gastroenterology fellowship program at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine since 1981, and has been the Chair of the Department of Internal Medicine since 1996. She takes pride on the academic accomplishments of her faculty, fellows and students and in the high level of medical care that they provide. In an effort to organize the future of medical leadership, she is councillor to the University of Puerto Rico Alpha Omega Alpha chapter and also as regional councillor coordinates joint activities with the three chapters of Alpha Omega Alpha in Puerto Rico. In addition to carrying out her duties as Chair of Internal Medicine and Professor, Dr. Torres still sees gastroenterology patients every day, personally follows and is the attending physician for all hospitalized inflammatory bowel disease patients at the University Hospital through out the year, and rotates for three months out of the year as the attending physician for the gastroenterology service at the hospital. She is the principal investigator of numerous clinical trials, many of which are part of national multi-center clinical studies, has taken leadership roles in committees at the national level in her clinical area of expertise and serves as one of the two medical directors of the program for coordinating organ procurement for transplants for patients in need in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Esther Torres was born and raised in Puerto Rico by her father, a civil engineer, and her mother, a dedicated homemaker; she has a younger sister. She told me: "Medicine is the only profession I can remember ever wanting to pursue although my mother told me that the very first thing I said I wanted to be was to be a teacher. Now I am both." The educational system in Puerto Rico had trouble keeping up with her. She skipped kindergarten and second grade in elementary school. In high school she skipped the 10th grade. She graduated in 1964 from the University of Puerto Rico High School, at the age of 15. By then she had already taken college credits in Spanish, English and Basic Sciences. She still remembers getting over her shyness as a very young freshman in college, but she took full advantage of the college opportunities available then to her, both academically and socially. She completed with honors a bachelor's degree in general sciences with a minor in English at the University of Puerto Rico, and actively participated in the Kappa Phi social sorority (local to Puerto Rico) and in their leadership, enjoying the camaraderie that she had missed while in high school. She was also member of the Pre-Med club and edited their newsletter. Tennis entered her life in college, following in the footsteps of her mother's side of the family, which had already produced two all-Puerto Rico tennis champions. Dr. Torres felt that going to medical school would be tough but she had the confidence instilled in her early on by her family, and in particular by her father, that there would not be any insurmountable barriers to her dream. At 19 years old, she was one of the youngest members of her medical school class at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, which consisted of 82 students, including 10 women. She recalls the collegiality of her classmates and also that it seemed that everyone stayed up all night. After flunking her first exam after a coffee-fueled all-nighter, she says that she began to study as soon as she got home and made sure to stop by 10 PM at the latest. It seems to have worked. The defining moment in her medical school career came the summer between her junior and senior year. Until then, she had planned to make a career in clinical pathology. That summer, she was hired by Dr. Pedro Humberto García-Pont to help out in a multi-center Post-Transfusion Hepatitis Study in the Veterans' Administration (VA) Hospital Investigation Unit. She participated with the residents in the didactic and clinical activities of the gastroenterology (GI) division and compiled a database of the liver biopsies done at the hospital (by hand using index cards in those days). Dr. García-Pont and his team were so impressed with their student assistant that they persuaded her in her senior year to change her planned residency in pathology at the University Hospital to an Internal Medicine internship at the VA Hospital. In retrospect, Dr. Torres says that she cannot imagine a better place for her to have done her internal medicine training. She enjoyed great faculty relationships, camaraderie between residents, and the opportunity to rotate early on among the different sub-specialties. She was already doing bone marrows, placing intraperitoneal dialysis cannulas, and performing liver biopsies by the time she was a second-year resident. Encouraged and sponsored by Dr. Elí Ramírez, Chief of Internal Medicine at the VA Hospital, she did a combined residency/fellowship program in gastroenterology in four years. The encouragement that she received during her internal medicine residency at the VA Hospital and the experience gained in those years gave her the self-confidence that helped her overcome the challenge of being the lone female in the field in Puerto Rico. She and four other GI fellows had to cover three hospitals with a large number of acute patients. Dr. Torres was the first woman to complete the gastroenterology fellowship and in doing so became the first woman to practice gastroenterology in Puerto Rico. Dr. Carlos Rubio, then Chief of Gastroenterology at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, recruited Dr. Torres as an Instructor at the Medical School and she was given the responsibility for teaching the second-year medical students. She supervised fellows, residents and medical students and also started her solo private practice one afternoon per week, using the office space provided pro bono to her for two years by Dr. Federico Hernández-Morales, as had been Dr. Hernández tradition for other fellows starting their practices. For the next five years, Dr. Torres kept both a full time academic load, with a schedule packed with committee meetings and lectures, and a small solo private practice, with her mother as her office assistant in addition to being her life-long personal role model. She still remembers the words of support that the late Dr. Roberto Rodríguez gave her, then the Acting Director of the Internal Medicine Department when she asked him for time to prepare for her Gastroenterology Boards in order to qualify for the position of Chief of Gastroenterology. She passed her Boards, and got the job in 1981 in an uncontested process with the full backing of the faculty and fellows, the first woman in this position in Puerto Rico. In this same year she became President of the Puerto Rican Association of Gastroenterology. During the next eight years, she worked to expand and strengthen the fellowship program. By then she had developed a special interest and expertise in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and those with liver diseases, and in particular, hepatitis. She took care of patients in the Puerto Rico Medical Center as well as those in her private practice. Soon she became well known in the medical community and became the point of referral from all over the island for patients with these medical conditions. By 1989 she received her promotion as Professor of Medicine, excelling in service, teaching and research. However, not everything in her schedule was work. She married Dr. Carlos Rubio in 1986 and found time in her schedule to develop her tennis game at the Baldrich tennis open public courts. There, she enjoyed the camaraderie of League Play at the 3.5 level. By 1994 she was part of a team of 10 Puerto Rican women that reached the semifinals of the U.S.T.A. National Championships in Palm Spring, CA. During the 1990s, Dr. Torres faced many challenges as well as opportunities. However, over time she turned adversity into strength, and this has become evident to those who deal with her. Her involvement in clinical research flourished. She presented her work in the United States, Europe, and in different parts of Latin America. In 1996 Dr. Angel Román Franco, then the Dean of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, asked her to take the position of Interim Director of Internal Medicine after Dr. Mario García-Palmieri retired from this position, one of the most senior medical positions on the island. At the time she was reluctant to do so but still remembers a conversation with her sister that went along these lines: "How are you going to say no to something you have not even tried?" She listened, and after two months in the acting job, she decided to compete for the regular appointment. With the backing of the faculty, residents and fellows, she was subsequently selected as the Chair of Internal Medicine at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, the first woman to occupy this position. Dr. Torres is now one of only seven women Chairs of Internal Medicine in the 126 medical schools in the United States. One of her prerequisites for accepting this position was that she would be allowed to continue what she loves most: patient care and teaching. Dr. Torres had to close her private practice of 20 years, but many patients followed her to the Medical School Intramural Practice. To this day, she sees patients every week-day for 2-3 hours, often starting work at 7:30 AM and finishing at.7:00 PM. She sees patients with hepatitis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), evaluates patients for liver transplant and follows them upon their return to Puerto Rico after the transplant. She says that one-on-one patient contact is the most important reward. She admits that the experience helps her "put other worries in life into perspective and is in many ways humbling." Over time, it became evident that there was a need to evaluate in an integrated manner IBD patients that had been followed for many years primarily from the surgical standpoint. Dr. Torres therefore opened a monthly multidisciplinary clinic about 4 to 5 years ago, where these patients can see both the IBD surgeons and the gastroenterologists, as well as receive nutrition and enterostomal counseling, avoiding the need to make additional trips to the Medical Center. In addition, Dr. Torres continues to coordinate and provide medical counsel for the monthly Saturday support group for Inflammatory Bowel Disease patients that she began in 1994, and still personally provides medical care, including taking calls year-round for her hospitalized patients with IBD. Dr. Torres truly enjoys the teaching aspect of academic medicine. It is one of her greatest sources of satisfaction to see the student, resident or fellow learn, develop, and become aware of their own capabilities and step up to the challenge of the practice of medicine. She supervises GI fellows, residents and students rotating through gastroenterology and the hospitalized patients under their care for three months a year. Since 1999, Dr. Torres also directs the weekly liver transplant clinic, supervising the work of GI fellows and rotating residents. She remains dedicated to clinical research and her fellows are significantly involved in it. She uses a team-building approach. Fellows are supervised but also are given responsibilities to help run this research as sub-investigators. They work hand-in-hand with the research coordinators, and also function as co-authors in published research. Dr. Torres also encourages and expects them to present their findings to the academic community. Dr. Torres also uses a team building approach as she performs her daily duties as Chair of the Department of Internal Medicine, by sharing responsibility and delegating duties. She will not ask others to do what she is not willing to do herself. She is known for a straight-forward approach, is very accessible, and lets the faculty, fellows and residents know where she stands. She listens to other's ideas and promotes independent thinking. Dr. Carmen González-Keelan, Professor of Pathology at the medical school, says that Dr. Torres knows how to motivate people to do their best, and how to give positive and affirming feedback. Dr. Torres participates in national and international meetings in her area of expertise, demonstrating the strengths, values, and the commitment to excellence and service of her department and of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. She is also an active participant in professional associations such as the American College of Physicians, the American College of Gastroenterology, the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease and the Association of Professors of Medicine. Dr. Torres also finds time to travel and to explore new places. She is never one to miss an art museum, particularly if French Impressionism is on display, and goes to concerts, musicals and plays. At home, she cherishes a good game of tennis, visiting with family and friends, reading fiction, listening to classical music and ballads, and catching a well-deserved good night's sleep. But most of all, she continues to look forward to the excitement of a new day full of challenges and possibilities.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Vicki Malick
Joann Urquhart, M.D.
Cardiovascular Medicine
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
Ongoing
Rockville, Maryland
STORY:
I would like to share the story of a woman physician who is very admired in the community not only by her physician colleagues but especially by her patients. Dr. Joann Urquhart is the kind of physician all patients should have. Besides being an excellent cardiologist, she is also easy to talk with. I've heard total strangers rave about how fortunate they are to have her as their physician. In fact, several of Dr. Urquhart's patients bring their family members to see her and some patients return from out-of-state just to be followed by her. Not only is she a physician, but also a wife and mother. She listens not only to her patient's heart but to how they live their life and she shows genuine interest in her patients. Dr. Urquhart trained with the best and told me once that she decided on cardiology because those doctors were the smartest during her initial training. She wanted to be the best so became a cardiologist! I admire her because she is a solo practitioner in a field that is dominated by men. But I am confident that she can hold her own with anyone and I have never heard a disparaging word about her. Dr. Urquhart loves being a cardiologist. Despite being offered academic positions at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, Dr. Urquhart chose to remain in private practice in Rockville, Maryland. Dr. Urquart also trained at the NIH many years ago as a Senior Staff Fellow in the Cardiology Branch, NHLBI. I am pleased to be able to write about her and thankful she decided on the path of private practice. Her patients are fortunate to have such a superb physician caring for them and she is doing her part to prevent and treat heart disease.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Christine Chastain-Warheit, MLS
Katherine L. Esterly, MD
Pediatrics
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
Over the last several decades
Delaware
STORY:
Katherine L. Esterly, M.D., chair of Christiana Care Health System's department of Pediatrics, is a 2003 recipient of the Dr. James Tilton Distinguished Service Award given by the University and Whist Club in Wilmington. The award recognizes Dr. Esterly's outstanding contributions and service to improve infant health in Delaware. Dr. Esterly has been called Delaware's "Infant Health Hero". She has spent her career working tirelessly to improve the health of mothers and infants. For many years Dr. Esterly was the only neonatologist in Delaware and devoted countless hours to improve conditions for vulnerable premature infants, both medically and on a state and public policy level. Dr. Esterly is the current director of Child Development Watch Program, a clinical associate professor of pediatrics at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, an attending neonatologist at the DuPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, DE and a consultant for the Department of Pediatrics at St. Francis Hospital in Wilmington, DE.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Anonymous
Dr Ronda Burmeister
Family Practice
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
now
Long Island New York
STORY:
My family doesn't like going to the doctor. We all think we're invincible and that we're going to live forever--except of course my mom--she seems to always need some medical attention. When the old family physician, Dr Mills, retired--he used to make house calls--my family didn't have a doctor for a long time. Then, one of my youngest brother's friends decided she was going to be a doctor. And she went to medical school, did her residency, and joined a practice in the old neighborhood. Along the way she also married my brother's best friend and has been part of the family for a long while. I love 300 miles away from from home but I know that everyone goes to see Dr Ronda when they get sick or they need a check up. My nephew who is 8 thinks Dr Ronda is beautiful--he likes going to the doctor. Dr Ronda has made good medical care available to my family--while becoming one of the family herself. To her--I say thank you.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Anonymous
Claire Louise Caudill, MD
Family Medicine
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1912 - 1998
Morehead KY
STORY:
Dr. Claire Louise Caudill was born in Morehead Kentucky on August 19, 1912 to Judge Daniel Boone and Etta Proctor Caudill. Dr. Caudill was raised in a family compelled to a deep involvement in community affairs. Her family was a strong advocate for "giving services back to the community". In fact, in the small community of Eastern Kentucky, three doctors were born in the same Caudill family. Dr. Caudill's education began at Morehead Normal School. She attended MNS for three years and then transferred to Rowan County where she graduated high school in 1930. She attended Morehead State Teachers College for one semester and then enrolled at Ohio State University and graduated from OSU with a B.S. degree in Physical Education in 1934. Dr. Caudill was a member of the Ohio Beta Chapter of Pi Beta Phi. During the summer of 1934, Dr. Caudill joined the staff of Morehead State Teachers College in the Department of Physical Education. In 1942, she became the college's first Director of Women's Physical Education. She served at MSTC until 1943; but in the interim she attended Columbia University in New York City and received her M.A. degree in 1936. Dr. Caudill's next venture was Medicine. She was admitted to the University of Louisville College of Medicine in the spring of 1943. After graduation in 1946, she did her internship at the Hospital of the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia, 1946 - 1947. After completing her studies, Dr. Caudill returned to Kentucky and took extra training in obstetrics as the Physician in Residence at the Oneida Maternity Hospital in Oneida Kentucky in 1947. It is there that she met her lifelong associate and faithful nurse, Susie Halbleib; Susie worked with Dr. Caudill for over 50 years. In January of 1948, Dr. Caudill opened an office in Morehead for the practice of Family Medicine. Caring for mothers and babies became the major focus of Dr. Caudill's practice. Dr. Louise, as she came to be known, traveled the hollers around Morehead and Rowan County in Eastern Kentucky with Susie to visit patients in their homes. In time, she established a patient following and treated patients and delivered babies. Dr. Caudill was even nicknamed the Mother of Rowan County and for good reason; it has been estimated that Dr. Caudill delivered over 8,000 babies during the course of her career. Many residents in the area bear the name of Louise or Susie in their honor. Dr. Caudill was often recognized for her leadership, her skill, and her compassion as a physician and a friend. Local communities, state businesses, and universities bestowed numerous meritorious and honorary degrees upon Dr. Caudill over the years. In 1994, Dr. Caudill was honored as the Country Doctor of the Year by the Country Doctor Museum in Bailey North Carolina. In 2000, the Commonwealth of Kentucky recognized Dr. Caudill by hanging her portrait in the capitol along with other Kentucky women who have made significant contributions to the people of the state. Other awards among many include the Morehead Lions Club Achievement Award in 1955, the Citizens Award for Doctor of the Year in 1974 from the Kentucky Academy of Family Practice, Woman of the Year Award from the Kentucky Federation of Business and Professional Women in 1979, Honorary Doctor's Degree for Public Service from the Morehead State University in 1981, Honorary Doctor of Laws from Thomas More College in 1990, Outstanding Private Individual for Northeast Kentucky in 1993, and Distinguished Rural Kentuckian Award by the Kentucky Association of Electrical Cooperatives in 1997. Upon her death in December 1998, Dr. Caudill had completed over 50 years of ministry to the people she called "our people". Whatever they needed, Dr. Caudill was there for them: home visits, deliveries, listening, and even building a hospital. Dr. Caudill was still working the day she died and had only missed one day in the office in all her years of service. She was an extraordinary woman. Dr. Caudill, as she was taught in her early years, wanted to give something back to her community that would be lasting long beyond her time. She successfully did this. Dr. Caudill was the most instrumental factor in building a hospital for the people of Eastern Kentucky. In the early 1960's, Dr. Louise gathered the people of Rowan County and proposed the idea of building a much needed hospital for the region. The need was readily recognized but it took a person of vision, desire, and love for people to provide the direction. That vision, spirit, and determination led the people to an achievement that was just short of miraculous. Together the community raised a quarter of a million dollars and recruited the Sisters of Notre Dame of Covington Kentucky to own, manage, and support the dream to establish a hospital, providing modern healthcare for families and the community. In addition to enlisting the help of the Sisters of Notre Dame, University of Kentucky Medical Center dignitaries were also recruited to help establish not only sound construction for the hospital and provide technical advice, but they also established St. Claire as a teaching hospital and affiliate for the University of Kentucky College of Medicine (A Medical School Is Born, R. Straus, 1996). On July 1, 1963, this dream was realized. St. Claire Medical Center opened its doors. Named for Dr. Claire Louise Caudill, the 41-bed acute care hospital experienced phenomenal support in the region. Today, St. Claire Regional Medical Center provides specialty care services from a modern 159-bed Regional Referral Medical Center. Dr. Caudill served as St. Claire's first Chief of Staff in 1963 and again in 1972. She also served on St. Claire's Board of Directors from 1976 until her death in 1998. St. Claire Regional has been a focal point of quality and compassionate care, a center of medical excellence and education, an innovator in the providing of care as is reflected in the use of telemedicine which has been in operation at St. Claire since 1995. The legacy that Dr. Louise started continues to grow and be strengthened. The communities, employees, medical staff, volunteers, and Board of Directors of St. Claire Regional Medical Center share the vision, spirit, and determination of Dr. Caudill that resulted in the National Rural Health Association designating St. Claire Regional as National Outstanding Rural Practice in 1993. This could never have happened without the original orchestration of Dr. Louise. With approximately 1000 employees, St. Claire Regional is now the second largest employer in the region. The medical staff numbers over 100 and represents more than 30 specialties. Dr. Caudill's dream of a hospital was shared and became a reality. The dream grew and the medical center grew with additions to the original building and the addition of numerous services. As each was added, the mission of proclaiming God's goodness through a healing ministry always remained the focus and still does today. The spirit, determination, and compassion that Dr. Claire Louise Caudill brought to Eastern Kentucky remains a strong spirit today, a tribute to a great teacher, physician, friend, community member, visionary - a tribute to a woman we remember as our own Dr. Louise. 11/2003 This story is submitted with assistance of the following: Susie Halbleib Sister Mary Margaret Droege Donna Besant A Medical School Is Born, R. Straus, 1996
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Tufts Health Sciences Library
Priscilla White
Diabetic Children
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1920-1930's
Massachusetts
STORY:
Dr. Priscilla White was a highly accomplished physician who dedicated more than fifty years of her career to treating patients with diabetes. Her research and treatment protocols made it possible for diabetic women to bear healthy babies, increasing fetal survival rate from 54 percent in the 1920s to approximately 97 percent in the late 1970s to 1980s. A graduate of Tufts Medical School in 1923, Dr. White interned at the Worcester Memorial Hospital, one of the few places that accepted women at the time. In 1924 she became associated with Dr. Elliot Joslin and Dr. Howard Root. They subsequently formed the Joslin Clinic, which has since made many significant advances in the treatment of patients with diabetes. Dr. White focused on diabetic children, developing the Clara Barton Diabetic Camp for girls in 1932. She also became a joint editor with Dr. Joslin of a textbook entitled The Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Tufts Health Sciences Library
Sara Jordan
Gastroenterology
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
Early 20th Century
Massachusetts
STORY:
Dr. Sara Jordan, a world-renowned gastroenterologist, became one of the founders of the Lahey Clinic. She also became the first woman member of the American Gastroenterological Association and served two terms as its president. Dr. Jordan graduated from Radcliffe College in 1904. Although she always wanted to become a doctor, it was almost unthinkable for a woman to study medicine at that time, and her father refused to finance her medical education. During World War I Dr. Jordan became determined to put herself through medical school and subsequently enrolled at Tufts; she graduated summa cum laude in 1921. She accepted Dr. Frank Lahey's invitation to join him in the organization of a new clinic. As Dr. Jordan was not yet a specialist in any branch of medicine, she chose the comparatively new field of gastroenterology, and subsequently obtained additional training in Chicago with Dr. Sippy. When she was at last ready for her life work, she was thirty-nine years old. However, she went on to earn an international reputation for her work as chair of the clinic's Department of Gastroenterology.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Bob Dunkley
Marie Nyswander
Addiction medicine
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1965
New York
STORY:
Marie Nyswander and her co-researcher, Dr Vincent Dole published in JAMA Aug 23 1965 Vol 193 No 8 P 80, the research that came from the Rockefeller Institute and Manhatten General Division of Beth Israel Hospital, New York that showed that methadone would be useful as a treatment for heroin addiction. At that time, treatments for heroin and other opiate addictions were punitive and had a high relapse rate, offering the addict very little hope. As a worker in addiction therapy, the insight provided by these two workers has revolutionised the lives of addicts. I have no more biographical details of Marie Nyswander - except she became Mrs Vincent Dole !! I, and millions of other pharmacists around the world daily see the benefits of this seminal paper by Marie Nyswander in giving heroin addicts a life and some hope for the future.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Alice {nelson lyle}Hoffman
leslie kent
internal medicine and gynecology
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1935
Eugene Oregon
STORY:
She was the first woman president of the Lane County Medical Society and the first woman president of the Oregon Medical Society. She told me (a college age employee} that delivering a baby and driving home in the sunrise was a supreme experience.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Matthew Rogers
Dr. Janelle Goetcheus
Practicing Medicine for the poor & homeless
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
On-going
Washington, DC
STORY:
Dr. Janelle Goetcheus has done more to improve the lives of sick and homeless persons in the District than any other doctor, male or female, living or deceased, since 1979. She founded Columbia Road Health Services which has operated since 1979 and Christ House, the first 24-hour medical recovery facility for sick and homeless persons in the country. Christ House alone has had over 5,200 patient admissions since opening. Dr. Goetcheus helped to found Healtcare for the Homeless which has become Unity Health Care (UHC). UHC is DC's medical clinic system and operates in more than 28 locations around the city providing care for the indigent. She also helped to found and organize the Archdiocesan Health Care Network which provides specialty care at no cost. She is an uncommonly humble, warm, loving and generous person and continues to go out on the UHC medical outreach van providing medical care and succor to the homeless that congregate in parks 2 time each week. It is probably her humility and her patients' inability to access the internet that have prevented her from being one of the 46 women doctors posted on your website. She is the absolute best doctor to the poor that I've ever encountered and that matters a lot in the Nation's Capital.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Martine Rothblatt
Robyn Barst MD
Pediatric Cardiology/Pulmonary Hypertension
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1990
New York City
STORY:
Dr. Barst created the first medical treatment for pulmonary hypertension, which was a previously uniformly fatal disease. She did this by badgering the pharmaceutical industry to develop a medical treatment for what was a rare or orphan disease. She then led the clinical trials for this new medicine, called prostacyclin, culminating in a landmark New England Journal of Medicine article under her lead authoriship. She also established the world's first Pulmonary Hypertension Center at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in New York. She is considered the founder of at least three pharmaceutical companies devoted to rare pediatric diseases, including United Therapeutics, Actelion and Encisive Pharmaceuticals.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Barbara Ann Eckhart
Dr. Hazalip
elderly
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
90's
Eastland, Texas
STORY:
Dr. Hazilip is very good doctor when I needed a good doctor when we moved to Cisco, Texas in 1990. Her and her children lost husband and father to cancer. She went overseas with her children and worked as doctor in foreign country. She worked in a clinic in Abilene, Texas with the elderly and gives Diabetic classes in Eastland county. She needs to be commended. She is a wonderful Christian doctor and Mother. She immediately goes to the aid of members in her own church if needed. When I was her patient she always treated me so kind and sweet.
NAME:
DOCTOR’S NAME:
DOCTOR’S SPECIALTY:
Joanne Patricia Meyer
Dr. Helen Ferguson
not sure
WHEN STORY TOOK PLACE:
WHERE STORY TOOK PLACE:
1958 and into the 1960's
Glenshaw, PA
STORY:
I never had Dr. Ferguson as a doctor. I got to know her as a well-respected, older adult at Glenshaw Presbyterian Church when my family moved to Glenshaw in 1958. Dr. Ferguson was close to retirement age, but retirement was not her style. She kept her practice, eventually reducing its' size, until her own health problems made it impossible for her to continue practicing medicine any longer. Even after leaving the active practice of medicine, she was always willing to answer questions and discuss any medical problems and would leave the person with the questions knowing more about their health and what to ask their own physician to get the best care.
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